Animal Care, How To:

How to Assemble a Canine First Aid Kit

Canine First Aid Kit

Earlier this week, some friends and I went camping in the Crazy Mountains. There was a 3:5 ratio of canines to humans (unusually low for our group of friend) – still, we managed to talk about our pets for around 75% of the time. One of the topics covered? Our need for canine first aid kit. I decided to reference the list that Dr. Gustafson and I had compiled a year ago when we considered creating our own for the clinic.

The list below should provide you with a starting point for putting together your own first aid kit.

I’d also recommend visiting with your veterinarian about how to use each of the items below at your next wellness visit.

1. A Thermometer
A healthy dog’s body temperature is between 100°F and 102.5°F ( 38°C to 39.2°C). Don’t forget, temperature is taken rectally!

2. Tweezers

3. Blunt-end Scissors
For trimming hair away from wounds, and cutting wraps.

4. Triple Antibiotic Ointment
The same stuff you use on yourself!

5. Sterile Saline Solution
For irrigating eyes and wounds. NOT contact solution or other eye drops.

6. Electrolyte Tablets (Canine Specific)

7. A 10cc Syringe
For irrigating wounds

8. Alcohol Wipes
For cleaning wounds. Steal ’em from your own first aid kit.

9. Hydrogen Peroxide
Make sure to store in a light-proof container. Hydrogen peroxide can  be used to induce vomiting, but this should only be performed with the direction of your veterinarian. Can also be used to clean wounds.

10. Sterile Gauze Pads

11. 4″ Cotton Roll

12. 2″ & 4″ Vetwrap
Any self-adhesive works. Be sure not to wrap too tight, and to remove immediately if swelling occurs on either side of the wrap.

13. First Aid for the Active Dog, by Sid Gustafson, DVM

14. The numbers of your veterinarian, the nearest emergency vet, as well as a list of any medications that your dog takes.

In addition to the items above, talk with your veterinarian about including:

13. 81mg Enteric-coated Aspirin
Or another fever-reducer/NSAID more appropriate for your dog.

For a great article about assessing the seriousness of your dogs condition, check out Examining Your Dog: Determining the Seriousness of Injury and Illness, an article by Dr. Gustafson.

Any additions or experiences compiling your own canine first aid kit? Share in the comments!

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Pet Projects

Weekend Pet Project

Montanan dogs are lucky. Of all the places I’ve lived, the Bozeman area has got to have some of the most involved, thoughtful dog-owners. Ease of access to the outdoors is one of the many reasons that this area has received such an influx in the last 15 years, and everyone seems to want a dog to share it with. Trailheads in the area are full of well-mannered canines navigating the woods off-leash. People not only walk their dogs, they GET OUT with them.

Watching Cao’s rapt enjoyment of the outdoors magnifies the beauty and keeps me walking long after I would have otherwise turned for home. The dog that is usually warming one end of the couch is steeplechasing deadfall, frenetically digging for voles, and buzzing my legs as she rushes from one new smell to the next.

It’s not always convenient to make time in your schedule for a dedicated outing, but that’s the assignment for this week: Take your dog somewhere new and let your dog dictate the length of the walk. Walk as fast or as slow as you want to, but turn off your phone (better yet, leave it at home), bring warm gear, and look around. Watch your dog. Is he panting after only a few minutes? How’s her recall? Is he checking in? When has she had enough? How can you tell?

What can this walk tell you about your dog’s level of enrichment? We all make the effort to give our dogs what they need, but how often do we (willingly) let them dictate the duration of an activity?

When you’ve completed your project, post a picture of where it took you and let us know about your observations.

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