Animal Care, Willing Partnership

The Willing Partner’s Hierarchy of Needs

Anyone who signs up for six more years of school at the age of 26 must love being a student, but my junior year of undergrad, I grew weary of academia and decided to take a semester off from pursuing my German degree to ski bum. I worked as a snowboard instructor at a fairly large resort, and part of the training offered to us was a Children’s Accreditation. As a part of this course, we learned about Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, which Abraham Maslow conceived of as a part of his Theory of Human Motivation.

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs describes the basic human needs that must be met before self-actualization, or the realization of one’s full potential, can occur.

In the past few years, while talking with people about their animals and their veterinary and behavioral concerns, I often found myself referencing Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. Before we can achieve willing partnership with our animals, we need to make sure that their basic needs are met.

In order to help us achieve willing partnership, I’ve developed an adaptation of Maslow’s Hierarchy for companion animals. It’s new and still forming. Too anthropomorphic for you? Take what you will, and leave the rest. I welcome you to start thinking about where you draw the line between humans and other animals.

The Willing Partner's Hierarchy of Needs

In future posts, I will discuss each of the levels in detail, but for now, I submit this as food for thought, and welcome your feedback.

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Willing Partnership

Willing Partnership

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The human-animal bond is a relationship worth exploring. The Domesticates blog, podcasts and video series serves to aid readers in creating a willing partnership; a relationship in which the needs of both animal and human parties are fulfilled. A willing partnership is an idea that was defined for me by one of my mentors, Dr. Sid Gustafson, a veterinary behaviorist. In his experience, as in mine, domesticated species are happy to please their guardians, as long as we do our part to enrich their lives and cultivate a trusting, respectful relationship.

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